This series presents non-descript forms that are given context and meaning by their partners or grouping.  In some instances Individual elements are derived from a single object.  The final form of each speaks to the shared history of the set, and each component is complimentary to the other members.

 

My sculptural work takes tangible objects and arranges them to suggest intangible personal, familial, and communal relationships.  I beleive much of what defines us as individuals is a result of the people we surround ourselves with.

Sunday Supper
Sunday Supper

Baltimore From Many Perspectives exhibition, Unglazed white stoneware

Sunday Supper
Sunday Supper

Baltimore From Many Perspectives exhibition, Unglazed white stoneware

Sunday Supper
Sunday Supper

Baltimore From Many Perspectives exhibition, Unglazed white stoneware

Stay
Stay

Common Ground exhibition, Stoneware and pigment

Counter-Parts series
Counter-Parts series

Woodfired stoneware

Counter-Parts series
Counter-Parts series

Wheel thrown and hand built stoneware

Counter-Parts series
Counter-Parts series

Wheel thrown and hand built stoneware

Counter-Parts series
Counter-Parts series

Wheel thrown and hand built stoneware

Counter-Parts series
Counter-Parts series

Wheel thrown and hand built stoneware

Counter-Parts series
Counter-Parts series

Press molded and hand built stoneware

It took me a long time to give serious thought to functional work, pottery was something I did to occopy the time between sculptures.  I rarely finished or glazed my pots, and I much more enjoyed the early steps of forming something out of nothing.  It helped to clear my head while keeping my skills sharp.

 

An invitation to do a woodfiring with a small group gave me the push I needed to work through the trends I saw developing in my pottery (I would sneak a few pots into the firings of the classes I taught).  A few craft shows and pop-up shops followed, each one helped me dedicate longer sessions to just making pots.

 

Pottery is largely still a "cleansing" activity for me, I have no aspirations of becoming a full-time functional potter. But after making larger bodies of work, and seeing some of those objects at friends' homes of watching my wife pick out one of my mugs from the cabinet, I understand the satisfaction many serious potters must feel.

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware

Woodfired stoneware